Improve a weak immune system with probiotics

How do you know if you have a weak immune system? Simply put, frequent colds and flu, slow healing wounds or autoimmune conditions like, rheumatoid arthritis indicate compromised immune function. Thankfully, there is a natural way to strengthen immunity by consuming probiotics.

Can probiotics really stop infectious diseases? The short answer is yes! Dr. Colin Hill, at a Society for General Microbiology meeting, said “in all three animal diseases we observed a positive effect in that the animals were significantly protected against infection”. On the next NaturalNews Talk Hour, Jonathan Landsman and Nadia Ernestus will talk about the best probiotic-rich foods to eat and why supplements are NOT a good alternative.
Does all yogurt have probiotics? (the answer may surprise you)
I don’t want to offend yogurt lovers out there but, most commercially-produced yogurts have been pasteurized (over heated) – which tends to lower (and destroy) the friendly bacteria needed by the digestive system. Not only that, many brands have too much sugar and contain genetically manipulated ingredients. And, as we all know, too much sugar and GMOs only increase the risk of immune-related disorders like, inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), allergies and a host of infectious diseases.

As an example, Chobani Greek Yogurt states that its yogurt comes from “cultured pasteurized nonfat milk”. This would indicate that the product has been heavily processed to remove the fat – which, by the way is needed to help digest protein – leaving behind skim milk. Not only that, when you look at the label more carefully – it reveals 15-17g of sugar (depending on the flavor) per 5.3 oz. serving. And, on top of that, when asked about their probiotic content, they say ‘no one has any idea’. (I called them and that’s what they said)

Conversely, most high quality probiotic-rich foods like raw sauerkraut and miso often contain less than 2 grams of sugar and trillions of healthy microorganisms compared to the probiotic-deficient commercial brands of yogurt.

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